Current Courses

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Introduction to the Archaeology of Greece:

Please click here to be redirected to my syllabus page for "Introduction to the Archaeology of Greece", taught at Stanford University in Fall 2014

Alternatively, you may download a pdf copy by clicking here.


Introduction to Mediterranean Archaeology:

Please click here to be redirected to my syllabus page for "Introduction to Mediterranean Archaeology", taught at the University of Puget Sound in Fall 2016.

Alternatively, you may download a pdf copy by clicking here.


The Archaeology of Power: States and Empires in the Mediterranean and Near East in the First Millennium BCE:

Click here to download a pdf copy of my current course at the University of Puget Sound, "The Archaeology of Power: States and Empires in the Mediterranean and Near East in the First Millennium BCE".

Students in this course are publishing a series of digital essays that explore the manifestation and organization of power in human societies through a series of case studies of empires and states in the Mediterranean and Near East. You can access these essays, as they're written, here.


Homo Migrans: Modelling Migration and Mobility in the Archaeological Record:

Click here to download a pdf copy of my current course at SUNY-Buffalo, on approaches to studying human migration and mobility in the archaeological record.

The great novelist Salman Rushdie argues, “we live in the age of migration”. In fact migration is, paradoxically, one of the great constants throughout human history: our story is one of continuous movement and exchange, despite our attempts to draw neat geographical and conceptual boundaries around particular groups and regions past and present. In this course, we will take a long-term perspective on human migration, using the archaeological record of the ancient Mediterranean, Near Eastern, and European worlds to understand the concomitant causes and effects of human movements. Students will engage with the various types of evidence for studying migration and mobility, from genetics to skeletal biochemistry to artifacts and texts. Furthermore, students will examine various case studies from the Neolithic to Late Antiquity to understand how we can holistically account for and understand why and how humans move, and how such movements have affected the trajectories of human development. Emphasis will be placed on group discussion, evaluations of scholarly accounts of migration and mobility, and research that is methodologically holistic.